Spraying from Seven to Seven -or- Drop Pipes Next Season

We were long overdue for a new classic rock parody, so we decided to re-tackle one of the greatest rock ballads ever written. With the ongoing success of drop pipes (aka drop arms, drop legs, etc.) in corn, we’re promoting directed spraying in verse. If you’d like to read more about the research, check out […]

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Calibrating a Plot Sprayer

It’s the rite of passage of many agricultural summer students across the world: applying experimental treatments to field plots using a research sprayer. The results of these experiments may be the basis of new product use registrations, or provide clues into future scientific studies. Needless to say, the application method needs to be bullet proof […]

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Tank mixing urease and nitrification inhibitors in corn weed-and-feed applications

This article is based on work performed by Mike Schryver, BASF Technical Service Specialist. Introduction Nitrogen is an essential nutrient required throughout a plant’s lifecycle. It is commonly applied to corn in either a granular form as urea or in a liquid form as urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN). Depending on soil type and precipitation, significant amounts […]

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Air-Assisted Boom Sprayers

Hardi Commander (118 foot boom) with TWIN air-assist

Air-assisted boom sprayers have been around since the 70s. More common in Europe than North America, they have demonstrated value in mitigating drift and improving canopy penetration. The majority of air-assist systems are found on three-point-hitch or trailed sprayers, which is fine (and perhaps even preferable) as long as clearance, travel speed and acreage aren’t […]

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Mode of Action and Spray Quality

The decision on which application method is best for herbicides boils down to two main factors: (a) target type and (b) mode of action. In general, it’s easier for sprays to stick to broadleaf plants on account of their comparatively larger leaf size and better wettability compared to grassy plants. There are exceptions, of course […]

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