Direct Chemical Injection Systems – A Primer

No sprayer operator is more preoccupied with work rates, sprayer cleanout and tank mixes than the custom (aka contract) applicator. Perhaps this is why we’re seeing more direct injection systems on their sprayers in recent years. Injection systems employ additional tanks and pumps to introduce undiluted product directly into the carrier just prior to the […]

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The Label Summary Sheet Proposal

We’ve identified and discussed shortcomings in the content and design of today’s pesticide labels in an earlier article. From the perspective of the spray applicator, the information needed most often can be difficult to locate, anachronistic, contradictory, subjective or even missing from the label altogether. To truly encourage an applicator to read and follow the label we need a consistent, concise and […]

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How to interpret a water quality test result

It’s common advice: Test your water before using it as a spray carrier. You dutifully sample the well or dugout and await lab results. And what comes back is a whole lot of numbers. How to make sense of it all? All three of these tests report a large number of properties and identify specific […]

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Adjuvants – A Primer

Spreader/Surfactant penetrating wax paper to get to water-sensitive paper.

We can always count on receiving regular questions about tank mixes but in recent years we’re hearing more about adjuvants. Many pesticides are already formulated with a variety of adjuvants. Perhaps they are intended to improve shelf-stability, or mixing and/or product performance. A pesticide label may specify a particular name brand or generalize a category […]

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Mode of Action and Spray Quality

The decision on application method for herbicides boils down to two main factors: (a) target type and (b) mode of action. In general, It’s easier for sprays to stick to broadleaf plants on account of their comparatively larger leaf size and better wettability compared to grassy plants. There are exceptions, of course – at the […]

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