Does the Pull-Type Sprayer once again have a Place on our Farms?

The self-propelled sprayer revolution is complete in western Canada. Almost all sales of new equipment are self-propelled. In fact, the once thriving sector of Canadian-made pull-type sprayers, and the innovations they brought to spraying, has disappeared. In its place we have self-propelled sprayers that offer plenty of power, large tanks, high mobility and comfort, and […]

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Ten Tips for Spraying in the Wind

Choosing the right time to spray can be tricky. Our gut tells us that spraying when it’s windy is wrong.  The experts tell us that spraying when it’s calm is wrong. So when can you actually spray? I’ve always advised my clients to spray in some wind, because it has a few advantages. The main […]

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How Spot Spraying will Affect Sprayer Design

Some years ago, a friend recommended that I read The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell. In this book, Gladwell tries to understand why some things catch on, and others don’t. It’s a compelling read full of Gladwell’s trademark stories and his knack to deftly interpret scientific studies. He talks of connectors, mavens, and salesmen, as […]

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Putting a Number on Pesticide Waste

Waste (noun): an act or instance of using or expending something to no purpose. In agriculture, environment and economy are intertwined. Producers strive to obtain the maximum return on their inputs. They study incremental returns and avoid applying more inputs than necessary, especially if conditions don’t warrant it.  The financial incentive is powerful, and waste […]

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Don’t try this tempting shortcut

There’s a call that I’ve been getting for 20 years now. It came again this week. Someone has a twincap with two small air-induced tips, and they’re applying herbicides and fungicides with low water volumes, often 5 gpa, sometimes less. They call because they want to know how much wind they can spray in. Is […]

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